2019 NIHR Senior Investigators announced

Two investigators supported by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) have been appointed to the NIHR College of Senior Investigators for 2019. The appointees were named in the 12th round of the NIHR Senior Investigator competition.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 15 Mar 2019

Largest ever study of depression and anxiety now recruiting individuals from Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales

Researchers at King’s College London launched the largest ever single study of depression and anxiety in September 2018, recruiting in England, and are now opening the study in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. By recruiting at least 40,000 people who have experienced either depression or anxiety at some point in their life, the Genetic Links to Anxiety and Depression (GLAD) study will make important strides towards better understanding of these disorders and improving the lives of future patients.

By Administrator at 25 Feb 2019

Cannabis-based medicine to be tested in Alzheimer's trial

Researchers from the NIHR Maudsley BRC are to lead a pioneering new study into a cannabis-based treatment for people living with dementia. Alzheimer’s Research UK has awarded over £250,000 for the landmark phase II clinical trial of Sativex®, a cannabis-based medicine licenced in the UK. The drug has already been found to be safe in people and has been approved for use in the treatment of muscle stiffness and tightness experienced by people with multiple sclerosis. However, Sativex® is not currently licensed in the UK for any other indication, including treatment of the symptoms of dementia.

 

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 21 Feb 2019

CRIS blog: Using data on hospital episodes to look at the physical health of people with personality disorders

Dr Marcella Fok and Dr Chin-Kuo Chang used CRIS to look at the physical health of people diagnosed with a personality disorder.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 13 Feb 2019

Could intranasal oxytocin be used to treat people at clinically high risk of psychosis?

Oxytocin, a hormone most often associated with childbirth, is also known for its effects on social-emotional cognition and behaviour. According to new research supported by the NIHR Maudsley BRC, oxytocin also alters blood flow in the hippocampus — a brain region strongly implicated in the onset of psychosis — in those at clinically high risk of psychosis.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 12 Feb 2019