Could intranasal oxytocin be used to treat people at clinically high risk of psychosis?

Oxytocin, a hormone most often associated with childbirth, is also known for its effects on social-emotional cognition and behaviour. According to new research supported by the NIHR Maudsley BRC, oxytocin also alters blood flow in the hippocampus — a brain region strongly implicated in the onset of psychosis — in those at clinically high risk of psychosis.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 12 Feb 2019

NIHR Maudsley BRC researchers host dementia discussion in collaboration with South London Theatre

Several of our researchers led an exploration of sensitive issues raised by a production of Florian Zeller’s The Father, at South London Theatre in West Norwood on Wednesday 6 February. The Q&A session was chaired by the BRC’s Engagement and Impact Fellow, Dr Sally Marlow, and featured Rob Stewart, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology and Clinical Informatics, who also leads the BRC’s Informatics cluster.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 11 Feb 2019

CRIS Blog: Pathfinders and the public

Professor Robert Stewart discusses work supported by the MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder awards as well as a survey about people's views on sharing health data for research purposes, from Pathfinder colleagues at the University of Edinburgh.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 7 Feb 2019

Eating a healthy diet can ease symptoms of depression

An analysis of data from almost 46,000 people has found that weight loss, nutrient boosting and fat reduction diets can all reduce the symptoms of depression.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 6 Feb 2019

Mental health stigma greater in London and the south

A study undertaken by researchers at the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre and King’s College London suggests that people living in London and the south have more negative attitudes towards people with mental health problems than those living in other areas of England. The research was published in PLOS ONE.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 23 Jan 2019