NIHR Maudsley BRC Blog

Our latest news & events

Bringing together imaging and genetic mapping to investigate patterns of vulnerability in the brain

Dr Daniel Martins is a Clinical Research Associate, Dr Mattia Veronese is a senior molecular imaging scientist and Dr. Ottavia Dipasquale is a Research Associate, all in the Department of Neuroimaging at King’s College London. In this blog they discuss their recent study which is funded by the NIHR Maudsley BRC and has brought together scientists from across the world to define a new approach to integrate neuroimaging and a form of genetic mapping.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 21 Jan 2022

New collaboration with digital therapeutics company to investigate preventable opioid respiratory deaths

A clinical trial that is collecting data on the features of opioid overdoses within the safety of a clinicial setting will be integrating a monitoring platform into the research to investigate how to prevent deaths from breathing problems in opioid users.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 20 Jan 2022

Applications invited for Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Champion role

Applications are invited for the role of NIHR Maudsley BRC Champion for Equality, Diversity & Inclusion. The role holder will actively support the main streaming of diversity and inclusion initiatives across the BRC and act as an advocate for positive change.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 11 Jan 2022

Next generation of rapid-acting antidepressants: Can ketamine help prevent suicide?

Naghmeh Nikkheslat is a Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) who is working on a project funded by the NIHR Maudsley BRC to investigate the use of ketamine as a medication for depression. In this blog, she talks about her research into depression and the immune system and what we currently know about ketamine as an anti-inflammatory antidepressant in psychiatric emergencies.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 10 Jan 2022

New study demonstrates link between brain chemical and visual processing in autism

Researchers from King’s College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust have shown that there are variations in how a brain chemical called GABA regulates the processing of visual stimuli. The study showed that when autistic people are given a drug that activates GABA targets, their visual processing becomes more like that of non-autistic people.

 

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 6 Jan 2022